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At first, living conditions were primitive. Camps were overheated, under-ventilated, and foul smelling.
Click on the image to see a larger version
Click on the image to see a larger version
Click on the image to see a larger version


Click on the image to see a larger versionA room called the "dog room" with shelf-like bunks and a single stove in the center was used for sleeping. A canvas tick filled with straw and a shirt wrapped around a pair of boots served as mattress and pillow.

In the early days, men washed their clothes in an iron kettle outside in the snow. If they took a bath, it too was done out-of-doors. By the 1930s men washed themselves and their clothes under a shed called the "dingle" located between the mess hall and the sleeping area.




Click on the image to see a larger versionLoggers were extraordinary eaters. Their usual diet consisted of salt pork, baked beans and bread.



Pies, cakes, cookies, and donuts accompanied many meals. All meals were consumed in silence at pine or spruce tables covered with oilcloth.

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Click on the image to see a larger versionAfter a fourteen-hour day in the woods, the men returned to camp for their evening meal. When supper was over, they lit their pipes; played card games; swapped stories; sang popular songs or made up their own ballads. Loggers often played fiddles, banjos, guitars, and harmonicas. Clog dancing sometimes added to their enjoyment.

In addition to the cookhouse and bunkroom, buildings in a logging camp included a log barn for horses, a blacksmith shop, an office for the boss, and usually a store known as the "van" where the men bought shoes, mittens, stockings, or tobacco.

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Lumber camps resembled small villages.

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